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Whooping Cough Outbreak Despite A 100 Percent Vaccination Rate Forces School Closure In Texas

A whooping cough outbreak has forced a school in Houston, Texas to close early for the Christmas break. The school, St. Theresa Catholic School in Memorial Park, will be closed until January 6th. The outbreak has not only affected the students but also the staff. Some children have also been hospitalized as a result, the Houston Chronicle reports.

It’s one of multiple instances that point to the idea that whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is not indicative of a failure to vaccinate, but rather, a failing vaccine. According to Fox, “Officials with the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston said that 100 percent of students who attend St. Theresa Catholic School are vaccinated against the illness.”

According to ABC News,

According to a statement from the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston, the school notified the community of the first confirmed case on Dec. 4. The case was then reported immediately to the Texas Department of State Health Services to investigate. he archdiocese also said all of St. Theresa’s students are vaccinated, and it’s working closely with the Houston Health Department.

You can also view the press release sent out to the parents via the school at Greenmedinfo.com here, in also emphasizes that 100 percent of the children were and have been vaccinated.

It’s Not A Surprise

People shouldn’t be too surprised, however, because there is a lot of science that has been published over the years showing that multiple vaccines may not actually be working as well as they’re marketed to be.

For example, a study titled “The Pertussis resurgence: putting together the pieces of the puzzle” states:

More recent studies show that by 5 years after completion of a DTaP series, children were up to 15 times more likely to acquire pertussis compared to the first year after the series. Studies have also documented rapid decline in pertussis antibodies within as few as 2–3 years of the most recent aP vaccination, often to pre-vaccination levels and although antibody levels alone are not necessarily indicative of waning immunity, in this case given the higher risk of infection after aP vaccine with time, it is strongly suggestive of it.

A very recent study published in the Journal of The Paediatric Infectious Diseases Society titled: The 112-Year Odyssey of Pertussis and Pertussis Vaccines – Mistakes Made and Implications for the Future  outlines how, because of linked-epitope suppression, all children who were primed by DTaP vaccines will be more susceptible to pertussis throughout their lifetimes, and there is no easy way to decrease this increased lifetime susceptibility. (Full study)

In the last 13 years, major pertussis epidemics have occurred in the United States, and numerous studies have shown the deficiencies of DTaP vaccines, including the small number of antigens that the vaccines contain and the type of cellular immune response that they elicit. Because of linked-epitope suppression, all children who were primed by DTaP vaccines will be more susceptible to pertussis throughout their lifetimes, and there is no easy way to decrease this increased lifetime susceptibility.

A study published in BMC medicine titled “Asymptomatic transmission and the resurgence of Bordetella pertussis” emphasizes:

In this paper, we have presented empirical evidence — from both case and genomic data — for asymptomatic B. pertussis transmission following the switch from the wP to the aP vaccine in the US and UK. Then, using mathematical and computational transmission models, we have demonstrated that an aP vaccine which blocks symptomatic disease but not asymptomatic transmission is able to account for the observed increase in B. pertussis incidence…public health authorities may be facing a situation similar to that of polio, where vaccinated individuals can still transmit infection.lte

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